Why are 25% of Gen Zers bringing their parents on job interviews with them? Experts weigh in 'If you're old enough to go to work, you're old enough to explore what working life is on your own,' said one expert


 Some Gen Zers are relying on their parents for help with their job search — and some are even inviting their moms and dads to attend job interviews with them, according to a recent study by ResumeTemplates.com.

The survey found that 70% of Gen Zers have asked their parents to help them find a job, Sixteen percent say their parents submitted job applications for them — and 1 in 10 had their parents actually write their resume. 

But even more of a revelation is this: The survey found that 25% of Gen Zers say they've brought their parents along with them on job interviews.

This young-adult generation of job seekers seems to appreciate their parents’ wisdom, as 83% of respondents credit their parental guidance with landing their new job and advancing their career goals.  

Yet is the input and assistance from parents a good thing for job seekers, or are members of this generation taking the easy approach — and taking things too far? 

business people waiting for interview

A new survey found that 25% of Gen Zers have brought their parents along on a job interview. Job experts weighed in on this trend.  (iStock / iStock)

Three employment pros weighed in on what's behind this trend, on the drawbacks of letting parents take an overactive role in job-hunting — and more. 

Having a parent proofread a resume or cover letter is common, and asking a parent to role-play for an interview is appropriate — but are there limits to parental involvement in a job search? 

Most experts say it depends on the job seeker and other factors. 

"I think it just depends on the family dynamic, which is different from person to person," said David Rice, an HR professional at People Managing People, based in Atlanta, Georgia. 

"Some parents are overbearing and some kids always seek their parents' help, but in terms of looking for a job, every kid wants their parents to know they're doing the right things and pursuing opportunities," he said. 

job applicant at interview

Events of the last few years have only fueled the parental shadow, such as the pandemic and the unstable economy, said one human resources expert. (iStock / iStock)

Rice also said it's "totally OK to solicit or accept help from your parents, to pick their brains and apply their wisdom to your own search." 

Even so, when does that type of involvement cross the line?

What’s causing Gen Z to be so reliant on their parents?

Seeking parental help is due to several factors, experts say. 

"I think this is probably a bit of wisdom and laziness," said Rice. 

Events of the last few years have only fueled the parental shadow, such as the pandemic and the unstable economy, he said.

"We live in a culture and time of instant gratification, and it doesn't exactly encourage young people to endure any amount of failure."

"These groups have had to make quite a few shifts in their career and weather some storms, find work quickly, and do work that didn't align with their goals at times," Rice said.

"So they may have a certain level of wisdom that can be useful to Gen Zers in hunting for jobs." 

Still, he cautioned that some Gen Zers simply want to take a passive approach. 

"There certainly will be cases where, essentially, the person wants their parents to do it for them," said Rice. "I don't think it's controversial to say that children today have a bit more of a pampered existence than their parents did."

He added, "We live in a culture and time of instant gratification, and it doesn't exactly encourage young people to endure any amount of failure — so looking for help the moment it becomes challenging isn't exactly a surprise."  

Most job experts frown on bringing moms or dads along to a job interview. 

"Pursuing a job, getting it, and going to work is a journey that is meant to be a life experience, which shapes you and helps you move into adult life," Rice told Fox News Digital. 

gen z interview for a job

It is one thing to bring a parent along for the ride and have that parent wait in a nearby coffee shop or parking lot — but including a parent in a sit-down with an interviewer is taking parental involvement too far, said one expert. (iStock / iStock)

"It's not something your parents should be holding your hand through," he said. "And if I were a hiring manager seeing this, particularly in a person who is old enough to go to college, I'd be concerned about this person's ability to work unsupervised, make decisions on their own — and how easily they can be misguided."

Another expert had a similar reaction. 

"Parents should not go into a job interview with their child," said Jill Chapman, director of early talent development with Insperity in Houston, Texas. 

"If the parent is intimately involved in the process … it reflects poorly on the candidate."

She said it is one thing to bring a parent along for the ride and have that parent wait in a nearby coffee shop or parking lot — but including a parent in a sit-down with an interviewer is taking parental involvement too far. 

"It speaks volumes to an organization if the parent is intimately involved in the process, and it reflects poorly on the candidate," cautioned Chapman.

How can parents constructively help their kids?

There are some valuable ways parents can help. 

"Parents can help kids prepare for the interview ahead of time: Talk about what to wear, how to behave, and what to expect," Amy Morin, a psychotherapist in Marathon, Florida, who is the author of the book "13 Things Mentally Strong People Don't Do" and host of the "Mentally Stronger" podcast.

They can also provide insight regarding professional protocol. 

people waiting for interview

"Parents can help kids prepare for the interview ahead of time: Talk about what to wear, how to behave and what to expect." (iStock / iStock)

"Discuss things like basic social skills — such as turning off your phone — to how to ask questions about benefits such as health insurance," she said. 

Helping a child prepare for an interview is beneficial. 

"Perform a mock interview and give feedback," Morin added. 

"Review sample questions and talk about how to address tough questions or how to explain gaps in employment."

Another way parents can help their kids is to share their own employment anecdotes. 

"Talk about your own experiences in pursuing a job and relay what you learned," said Rice with People Managing People. 

"But insist that this is something that they have to do on their own," he said. 

"If you're old enough to go to work, you're old enough to explore what working life is on your own. Emphasize that this is a natural part of life and becoming an adult."

IT employment in the US was essentially flat in May — edging down by just 200 jobs from April — with total IT employment at more than 5.3 million, the TechServe Alliance reported today. May’s number follows four consecutive months of modest growth.

On a year-over-year basis, IT employment was down 21,900 jobs in May, according to the organization’s analysis of US jobs numbers.

“Although the overall job market posted strong gains, IT employment is still struggling to gain momentum after the extraordinary run-up in the aftermath of Covid,” TechServe CEO Mark Roberts said in a press release.

“With a multitude of mixed signals from the economy and pervasive uncertainty including the future direction of the Fed’s interest rate policy, many employers remain cautious in their hiring,” Roberts continued. “A counterweight to this caution is the need for companies to continue to invest in IT initiatives such as AI that are essential to maintaining a competitive edge.”

The TechServe Alliance also reported that engineering employment rose by 5,400 jobs in May for total employment of more than 2.8 million. Engineering employment is up by 42,200 jobs year over year.

The TechServe Alliance is a trade association of IT and engineering staffing firms.

A majority of transgender or gender-nonconforming workers say they have experienced bias in the workplace, according to a poll by Monster in honor of Pride month.

Of the 19% of workers who identified as transgender or gender nonconforming, 59% say they have felt discriminated against or treated differently at their place of work. In addition, 31% say there has not been progress made in the past year in terms of trans worker rights or inclusivity in the workplace, and 17% say inclusivity in the workplace has actually gotten worse.

Education may be a factor, Monster reported. A majority of all workers, 72%, say they have not received training or education in the past year around transgender awareness and inclusivity. Most workers, 79%, said they do not have or are not aware of, LGBTQ+ employee resource groups or equivalent support groups at their places of work.

Monster’s poll also found some other disconnects:

  • 68% of trans or gender-nonconforming workers say more policies should be in place to support trans workers, while only 17% of cisgender workers agree.
  • 62% of trans or gender-nonconforming workers say more inclusive healthcare coverage for trans workers is needed, while only 17% of cisgender workers agree.
  • 62% of trans or gender-nonconforming workers say more training/education for cisgender workers is needed, while only 17% of cisgender workers agree.

The survey included 1,609 US workers.

Post a Comment

Previous Post Next Post