I don’t have a problem with Tim Ferriss.

The Actual House of Tim Ferriss

You can entertain an audience of total strangers.

Maybe you’ve heard of Benedict Anderson, who wrote a nifty little book called Imagined Communities all the way back in 1983. Because of the printing press, we ultimately wound up with a powerful thing called “print capitalism,” an industry that allowed one person to speak to millions. Suddenly, you could create communities out of things other than religion or immediately shared living space. You could create communities around ideas and information. It was really exciting for a little while.

You can’t have a 4-hour workweek.

Let’s get real about the actual prospects of making this plan work. We know some people pull it off. Everyone else? Not a chance. See, a global economy can’t support millions upon millions of people jetting around the world and running businesses online. There will always be a sub-class of people working constantly behind the scenes, in sweatshops and kitchens, in order to sustain this dream lifestyle for a tiny few.

Let’s be honest about inequality.

No, I’m not trying to cancel Tim Ferris.