Bitcoin rose 8 % to $48,861.48 on Monday, adding $3,620.52 to its previous close.

Bitcoin, the world’s biggest and best-known cryptocurrency, has risen 76.2% from the year’s low of $27,734 on Jan. 4.

Bitcoin, the world’s biggest and best-known cryptocurrency, has fallen 16.3% from the year’s high of $58,354.14 on Feb. 21.

Bitcoin’s price soared this year as major firms, such as BNY Mellon, asset manager BlackRock Inc, credit card giant Mastercard Inc, backed cryptocurrencies, while those such as Tesla Inc Square Inc and MicroStrategy Inc invested in bitcoin.

Ether, the coin linked to the ethereum blockchain network, rose 8.74 % to $1,546.06 on Monday, adding $124.29 to its previous close.

A manager at Amazon.com Inc sued the online retailer for discrimination on Monday, saying it hires Black people for lower positions and promotes them more slowly than white workers, and that she was subjected to harassment.

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Amazon is seen at the company logistics centre in Boves, France, August 8, 2018. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

The lawsuit from Charlotte Newman, a business development head at Amazon Web Services who is Black, said the company suffers from a “systemic pattern of insurmountable discrimination,” despite its pledge to fight racism and statements of solidarity from Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos.

Seattle-based Amazon said it was investigating the claims. It said it strives for an equitable culture and has no tolerance for discrimination: “These allegations do not reflect those efforts or our values.”

The complaint was filed in Washington, D.C., federal court.

Newman, a Harvard Business School graduate and former adviser to U.S. Senator Cory Booker, said Amazon delayed by 2-1/2 years her rise to the senior manager by hiring her in 2017 for a more junior role for which she was overqualified, a “de-leveling” that reduces awards of company stock.

She also accused a male supervisor of using racial tropes by calling her “aggressive,” “too direct” and “just scary,” and another male co-worker of sexually harassing her and once pulling on her braids while saying, “You can leave this behind.”

Both men were also named as defendants, and according to the lawsuit the supervisor was required to undergo training while the co-worker was terminated. The co-worker’s lawyer could not immediately be identified.

Newman is seeking compensatory and punitive damages. She is represented by Douglas Wigdor, who also represented women suing the former movie producer Harvey Weinstein and Fox News over alleged harassment or discrimination.

Amazon has worked to show support for the Black Lives Matter movement. In September its cloud computing chief Andy Jassy, who will succeed Bezos as Amazon CEO, gave the keynote address at a Black Employee Network entrepreneurship conference.

The news site Recode last week reported allegations of racial disparities in Amazon promotions and performance reviews.

Amazon also faces lawsuits claiming it mistreated workers in its handling of the coronavirus pandemic at its facilities.

Airbnb recently informed travel bloggers that it will shut down its affiliate program at the end of March.

Airbnb launched the associate's program in May 2020. The program pays travel bloggers and influencers a percentage of guest and host fees for Airbnb stays and experiences they recommend and link to on their websites and social media profiles.

“Effective March 31, 2021, we will be closing our Airbnb Associates Program,” the company said in a note to members of the program. “Knowing this decision may have ramifications for you, we wanted to give you as much advance notice as possible and provide an update on the status and timeline for open commissions.” A web page advertising the program currently says it’s not accepting new signups.

Airbnb confirmed the change in an email to CNBC.

The decision to end the affiliate program comes after the company last month announced a new marketing campaign aimed at recruiting more hosts to its service. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company said it expects its sales and marketing expenses as a percentage of revenue in the first of 2021 to be higher than that of the second half.

“This is partially due to the marketing campaign that we are running in the first half of 2021 in advance of the summer travel season,” the filing reads.

Dan Bagby, a travel blogger, told CNBC he invests thousands of dollars per month on his website, which features guides for numerous Airbnb stays around the world. Since joining the associate's program in May, Bagby had made it his largest source of income.

“Now that the program is over, I will have to completely shift my strategy again as this source of income has gone away,” Bagby said.

Airbnb’s notice to members of the associate program said that they will receive commissions for their referrals between the 10th and 20th of the following month following the completion of a guest reservation. Airbnb said it will not pay commissions for any bookings made by guests using referral links after March 31.

“We encourage you to remove all active Airbnb Associate links on your site,” Airbnb said in its note to program members. “Thank you again for your partnership and we appreciate your understanding on this matter.”