One legacy of the coronavirus pandemic is that many people will be able to work from home permanently. That has compelled some workers who are no longer tethered to the office to consider moving.

But if you’re contemplating moving your family across state lines, consider how state and local taxes will affect your bottom line. Moving from a low-tax to a high-tax state could cost you thousands of dollars a year.

To help families make smart choices, Kiplinger.com has looked at the overall income, sales, and property tax burden in each state for a hypothetical married couple with two children, $77,000 in combined wages, $3,000 of other income, and a $300,000 home.

Five most friendly

1. Wyoming

(Denis Tangney Jr./Getty Images)
(Denis Tangney Jr./Getty Images)

State income tax: none.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 5.32%.

Wyoming’s generous revenues from mineral and energy extraction allow it to keep taxes on residents low across the board.

2. Nevada

(4kodiak/Getty Images)
(4kodiak/Getty Images)

State income tax: none.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 8.23%.

Along with no income tax, Nevada has the fourth-lowest average property tax rate in the country. However, the combined sales tax is the 12th highest in the nation, according to the Tax Foundation.

3. Florida

(Joe Sohm/Getty Images)
(Joe Sohm/Getty Images)

State income tax: none.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 7.05%.

Florida’s income tax rate of zero keeps state taxes low for middle-class families, but property taxes and sales taxes are about average for the country.

4. Tennessee

(Denis Tangney Jr./Getty Images)
(Denis Tangney Jr./Getty Images)

State income tax: none.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 9.55%.

Tennessee has no broad-based income tax and property taxes are reasonable, but sales taxes are the highest in the nation.

5. Washington

(Philip Kramer/Getty Images)
(Philip Kramer/Getty Images)

State income tax: none.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 9.23%.

Washington doesn’t have an income tax, and property taxes are about average, but sales taxes are high.

Five least friendly

1. Illinois

(Paul Brady/Getty Images)
(Paul Brady/Getty Images)

State income tax: 4.95% (flat).

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 8.8%.

Illinois’s income and sales taxes are above average for middle-class families, and its property taxes are the second-highest in the country.

2. Connecticut

(Walter Bibikow/Getty Images)
(Walter Bibikow/Getty Images)

State income tax: 3% to 6%.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 6.35%.

Sales taxes in Connecticut are reasonable, but the state’s income taxes for middle-income families are on the high end, and property taxes are the third highest in the nation.

3. Iowa

(Franckreporter/Getty Images)
(Franckreporter/Getty Images)

State income tax: 0.33% to 8.53%.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 6.94%.

Iowa’s income tax on our hypothetical family is the third highest in the country, and property taxes are above average too.

4. New Jersey

(Jon Lovette/Getty Images)
(Jon Lovette/Getty Images)

State income tax: 1.4% to 10.75%.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 6.6%.

Income taxes are relatively low and sales taxes are below average, but New Jersey’s property taxes are the highest in the country.

5. New York

(Matteo Colombo/Getty Images)
(Matteo Colombo/Getty Images)

State income tax: 4% to 8.82%.

Average combined state and local sales tax rate: 8.52%.

Although its income taxes aren’t too burdensome for middle-class families, New York’s average combined state and local sales tax rate is the 10th highest in the nation. Property taxes are up there too.

Rocky Mengle is tax editor and David Muhlbaum is senior online editor at Kiplinger.com. For more on this and similar money topics, visit Kiplinger.com.

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