'You're like Santa to us': Cypress woman builds snack stand for delivery drivers


 Yes, Christmas must go on, even in the midst of a global pandemic.

Giving back to others now is more essential than ever, according to Cypress homeowner, Seerat Nazmi. She and her husband, Larry are finding a way to pay it forward to everyone they meet, including delivery drivers.

The essential work of delivery drivers has been Nazmi's saving grace throughout the pandemic.

Paying it forward is more essential than ever, according to Cypress homeowner, Seerat Nazmi and her husband, Larry.  Now they're helping delivery drivers who have been their lifeline during the pandemic.

Paying it forward is more essential than ever, according to Cypress homeowner, Seerat Nazmi and her husband, Larry.  Now they're helping delivery drivers who have been their lifeline during the pandemic.

Seerat Nazmi

"We've been trying to be as COVID-19-friendly as possible this year," Nazmi told Chron. "These people are working so, so hard to make sure that we're getting things delivered when we need it. This is the least I can do."

Nazmi decided to set up a snack station at her doorstep to give back to those who have helped her bring necessities during COVID-19.

Paying it forward is more essential than ever, according to Cypress homeowner, Seerat Nazmi and her husband, Larry.  Now they're helping delivery drivers who have been their lifeline during the pandemic.

Paying it forward is more essential than ever, according to Cypress homeowner, Seerat Nazmi and her husband, Larry.  Now they're helping delivery drivers who have been their lifeline during the pandemic.

Seerat Nazmi

"It's the small things that can have such a domino effect," Nazmi said. "It makes you feel good to give back. It brings light in your life."

Since setting up this creative station with cold water and snacks at her doorstep, Nazmi's received some kudos from grateful delivery drivers.

"One UPS driver told me, 'You're like Santa to us.'  I said, 'No, you're like Santa to us! There are the milk and cookies!'" Nazmi said.

Nazmi hopes that this small act of paying it forward will set off a chain reaction of others giving back.

"It's such a hard year. I'm fortunate to be blessed. I have a job, can put food on the table, but there are so many people who don't have that," Nazmi said.  "If we can do our part, whether it's giving our time or helping out in other kinds of ways, it's the biggest gift that you can give not only to others but yourself, too."

Nazmi learned the importance of giving back early in life.

"Any time I have something good happen to me or come my way, I have to do something to reciprocate it and give back, that's what my parents taught me.  That's the balance," Nazmi said. "If you get, then you must give. And then that gift keeps giving back. I've done that all my life, and I've found nothing but happiness because of that."

These random acts of kindness can start on a small scale and ignite a real trend this season, Nazmi said.

"Start this trend where we find small ways to help each other. It can just be a small act of kindness, but when you do that, you inspire others."

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